Liquid Ink

The official website of Gint Aras, Finalist 2016 CWA Book Award


The 21st Century Holocaust

The video below is from December. Lucy Aharish told us then that we were facing a holocaust, and the world is witnessing that holocaust right now, amplified and accelerated before us: a barbaric, categorical slaughter of citizens.

While American leaders demonize these innocents, using them to fan fears among imbeciles and racists in an effort to secure votes, our global adversaries dare us to stop the slaughter, thumbing their noses while children lie dead on concrete and dirt, their mouths open like suffocated fish, their skin bleached and burned.An_Aerial_View_of_the_Za'atri_Refugee_Camp

Our grandchildren will ask us why we did nothing to stop the slaughter, why we allowed it to get to this point, and why we did not welcome the victims, offer them refuge. The answer isn’t complicated: we didn’t care. We believed in the delusion that these people were “over there” while we were “over here,” that there was some massive difference between them and us. We saw the videos and photos, read the testimonies, understood the geo-political game and sat back to say, “It doesn’t affect me.”

Whatsoever you do to the least of My people, that you do unto Me.

Realize who our most influential thinkers have been. We are not followers of Hamilton, Franklin, Lincoln or any of the people on our money. We are certainly not followers of Christ, who told us whatsoever we did to the least of His people we did unto Him.

There he is, Jesus of Nazareth, asking to be let in to our home, and we refuse because he might be a terrorist, this Middle Easterner with a beard.

Our most influential thinker is Ayn Rand. She would shake our hands right now and say, “Well done. Help is futile. Fools get what they deserve.” And look at the evidence! The stock market is rising, isn’t it? Haven’t the prices of homes gone up? Aren’t we “bringing back coal” and reducing regulations, cutting aid for the poor, ruining our presently bad schools, getting tough with unions, keeping terrorists out, making sure married people don’t sit at the table with members of the opposite sex, taking rights away from women, from minorities, from people we hired ourselves to work for less than minimum wage? All while shrugging at the images of a holocaust a half-hour after the electorate shrugged off a madman’s racism, rationalizing their vote by claiming they wanted “change” and had “economic reasons,” lying to themselves all in to the trope of bringing America back to some former greatness?

Greatness is just around the corner. Our grandchildren will be interrogating us sooner rather than later. They might not ask us why we did nothing to help. They might be wise enough—er, great enough—to ask the obvious question: “Grandfather, grandmother, why didn’t you care?”

 

Lucy Aharish – nobody stopping holocaust in Halab, Syria from EurOpinion on Vimeo.

Photo of the Za’atri camp in Jordan from Wikipedia


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How to kill the middle class and ruin the environment 

In our attempts to make sense of how anyone would have voted for the president (when the answer is obvious), we keep losing sight of what’s happening. 

The following bills have been introduced:

1. HR 861 Terminate the Environmental Protection Agency

2. HR 610 To distribute Federal funds for elementary and secondary education in the form of vouchers for eligible students and to repeal a certain rule relating to nutrition standards in schools.

3. HR 899 Terminate the Department of Education

4. HJR 69 Providing for congressional disapproval under chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, of the final rule of the Department of the Interior relating to “Non-Subsistence Take of Wildlife, and Public Participation and Closure Procedures, on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska”. 

5. HR 370 Repeal Affordable Care Act

6. HR 785 National Right to Work (this attacks collective bargaining, ending unions)

7. HR 147 Criminalizing Abortion (“Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act” or PRENDA)

8. HR 808 Sanctions against Iran

The assault on unions and public schools all at once is driven by nothing more complex than basic human greed. At institutions of learning nationwide, educators are perceived as liabilities, a waste of money that could go to an administrator. If they could get rid of the teachers union and all faculty, they could teach classes with software, and a pile of money would appear for whomever was left.

How are any of these proposals acting in the best interest of the middle class that “feels forgotten”? How is the pollution of our planet, and acceleration towards an extinction event, in the interest of the wealthiest Americans, or of college administrators, or of tea party activists, or of Nazis? Don’t you think it’s weird that the 1%, tea party “patriots”, gun addicts, skinheads, Nazis and champions of Jean Raspail now form a political coalition? 

The swamp was drained to reveal monsters who had only been stuck in the muck. Now they get to crawl up on shore. 


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Coleson Whitehead on delusion

I must admit that I’ve yet to read The Underground Railroad, although it’s high on my list of books to get to soon. This quote gets to something I’ve been thinking about for a long time, for longer than we’ve had a fascist leading our country, a man most everyone in America disapproves of, except for white men.

And America, too, is a delusion, the grandest one of all. The white race believes–believes with all its heart–that it is their right to take the land. To kill Indians. Make war. Enslave their brothers. This nation shouldn’t exist, if there is any justice in the world, for its foundations are murder, theft, and cruelty. Yet here we are.

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Photo of Coleson Whitehead from Wikipedia


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Roger Reeves on severed tongues

I’ve had the pleasure and honor of reading together with Roger Reeves on a few occasions here in Chicago. I think you’ll appreciate what this poem does to you.

Cymothoa Exiqua

cymothoa exigua*: the tongue as what it is not—blemish
and parasite: gimp and glottal stop: what question can be
answered with a truant mouth: can the lynched man hung
from the sails of a windmill taste the lead pipe wedged
between his lips: when the signifiers dangle, empty chum
lines in a cold creek: when the men in Waco, wearing white
straw hats, fraying at the crisp edges of their white shirts,
leave Jesse, leave John, leave Paul in ashes in the unpaved
streets to choke passing mules into prophecy: when we pinch
our noses to staunch the smell of the twice burnt black man
burning for a third time this day: when the boys, sweet
and good animals, come to what’s been left in shallow ditches:
false rib and femur, clavicle and severed hand—quite simply,
the language of sorrow: glyph of the gadfly rooting himself
into the rotting meat of the dead: when it is too late
to refuse our bodies being made urns: corn, unharvested
and heavy in its husks: when, in the marketplace, the butcher lifts
our tongue from a bed of ice, shouts: who will speak for this flesh:
when the tongue answers as all severed tongues do:

*Notes:
Cymothoa exigua is a parasitic crustacean that attaches itself to the tongues of spotted rose snappers and extracts blood from the tongue until it atrophies and falls off. Then the parasite attaches itself to the nub and acts as the fish’s tongue. According to scientists, the fish is not harmed in the process.

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Photo of Roger Reeves from the Whiting Foundation


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Rita Dove on transcendence (or something like it)

I missed a few days due to some matters I won’t get into. My apologies. I hope this beautiful poem by Rita Dove makes up for it.

American Smooth

We were dancing—it must have
been a foxtrot or a waltz,
something romantic but
requiring restraint,
rise and fall, precise
execution as we moved
into the next song without
stopping, two chests heaving
above a seven-league
stride—such perfect agony,
one learns to smile through,
ecstatic mimicry
being the sine qua non
of American Smooth.
And because I was distracted
by the effort of
keeping my frame
(the leftward lean, head turned
just enough to gaze out
past your ear and always
smiling, smiling),
I didn’t notice
how still you’d become until
we had done it
(for two measures?
four?)—achieved flight,
that swift and serene
magnificence,
before the earth
remembered who we were
and brought us down.

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Photo of Rita Dove from Wikipedia.