Liquid Ink

The official website of Gint Aras, Finalist 2016 CWA Book Award


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Reading tonight in New York!

I’m in New York for tonight’s episode of Pen Parentis, the New York literary salon for writers who are also parents. Fitting for this hot day, our theme is “Love”. How did the organizers know I don’t write about anything else?

I’m joined by the mega-talented and enormously successful Jennifer Probst and Marcy Dermansky. The reading is in the ultra-swank Andaz Hyatt on Wall Street, where literary nerds rub elbows with masters of the universe. In the meantime, Jennifer, Marcy and I will entertain questions about how parents can carve out time to write.

Copies of The Fugue will be available for purchase, and I’ll be happy to sign your copy, along with all the copies you buy for the people you love.

If you’re in New York, I hope you’ll show up.

andaz-wall-street-a-concept-by-hyatt-entrancePhoto of the Wall Street Andaz Hyatt. 


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Reading in NYC, Why There Are Words

I’ll be reading from The Fugue at Why There are Words this Sunday evening, March 5th. Event details are included at this link. Yes, I’ll have books for sale, discounted at $16, and I’ll be available to sign them.

Please note that this reading requires tickets. You can purchase advance discounted tickets here at Brown Bag.

I haven’t read in New York since last spring, so I’m excited to romp around again. I’m sure there will be drinks afterwards. I hope to see you.

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Reading in New York, 3/30

I’m really excited to  be reading in NYC this week as part of the Guerrilla Lit Reading Series at Dixon Place. One note: this event is free but requires tickets, so if you’re planning to go, please secure tickets to be sure you can get in.

I’m joined by Jacob Appel and Gordon Haber. Jacob is the author of The Man Who Wouldn’t Stand Up while Gordon has founded the e-book press company, Dutch Kills Press. They are accomplished men-of-letters, and I’m thrilled to appear alongside them.

There’s always something special about doing book events in New York City. It’s strange to do it so soon after the glowing review of The Fugue appeared in the Chicago Tribune. I feel an odd bit of pressure. Still, it’ll be great to get back to some of my old stomping grounds and see old friends. If you’re in the area, I’d love to see you!

Guerrilla Lit Reading Series

Gint Aras, Jacob M. Appel, Gordon Haber

Dixon Place 161A Chrystie Street, NY, New York

7:30 PM

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Five months from book launch

I’m unable to take it for granted. Each time I tell people, “I have a novel coming out in December,” I get a little buzzed up.

I reread the book one more time over the last two weeks of July, cutting a phrase here and adding a word there. When I completed it, I went out to water the garden. Dazed, I was transported back to my small room in New York City, right on the corner of Broadway and 113th, where I originally penned the first sentences of a short story—Yuri’s Window—that would eventually become The Fugue. The novel, all 120,000 words, set (mostly) in Cicero, Illinois and handling a cast of over a dozen characters, started out as a short story about a sculptor living in Amsterdam who made his own window frames and stained glass out of shattered beer bottles and pieces of fences. The first words were put to paper in late 2000.

The short story became a novel on the advice of several classmates at Columbia. Really, it was at the insistence of my teacher, David Plante, whose feedback saw me change the setting, that I started realizing I really did have a novel. Fifteen years later, that novel is going to be published.

I’ll be telling the story of how I wrote the book and what sort of ideas I played with, how long it took me to develop them. The story of how The Fugue was written is almost as interesting as the story the book tells: a sculptor is sentenced to prison for murdering his parents, and upon release returns to his hometown to convalesce and sift through memories, shattered narratives and the ongoing psychological effects of a World War. Over the span of the novel, the plot moves from a nondescript field in Western Ukraine, through the landscape of Chicagoland, eventually to extinguish itself at the back window of a bungalow, only seconds before the home’s conflagration.

There will be time to explore all that stuff.

In this post, I want to cut a question off at the pass. I know someone will ask: Do you have any advice for aspiring writers?

Yes. Don’t ever give up.

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Tori Amos sings Creep

Well, I’m riveted. Tori Amos sings Radiohead’s “Creep”. Two of my favorite artists coming together this way. If you want to read the Rolling Stone write up, go here.  Although I listen to Pablo Honey quite a bit, I’m among those Radiohead fans who agree that the record was something “other than” or a “warmup job” or “not quite it” or whatever. Creep is still a good song. It speaks to me. I feel I understand its sentiments. Apparently, so does Tori.

Enjoy.