Liquid Ink

The official website of Gint Aras, Finalist 2016 CWA Book Award


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Intimate nights with Duo KaMa

If you’re in Chicago this week, you won’t want to miss these small, intimate concerts with the electrifying Duo KaMa.  Violinist Maria Storm and pianist Kathy Tagg combine energy, technical mastery and a beguiling, enchanting aesthetic to captivate you. Click here for recordings of them performing Debussy, Dvorak and Nigun, and just imagine how they would sound in a salon.

This week you have the chance to hear them in house concerts as well as an intriguing date at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art. This is the last chance to hear Duo KaMa play in Chicago in 2017.

Here are the dates and locations:

House Concert,
Thursday, September 14th, 7:00 PM
1146 S Taylor, Oak Park, Illinois

Gallery Concert
Saturday, September 16, 7:00 PM
Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art
2320 W Chicago Avenue

House Concert
Sunday, September 17, 4:00 PM
5850 W Race Chicago, IL

I hope to see you there.

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Artists you should know: KaMa Duo in Chicago

Admit it. You’ve never heard the music of the KaMa duo. However, all of this can change for those readers interested in visiting the Fine Arts Building in Chicago on November 18th. If you have the pleasure of listening to these ladies play, you’ll be so deeply moved and provoked by their mastery to be left with an impression for the rest of your life. Hearing their music is like standing under the volume of the Niagara Falls, if sunlight and an angel’s embrace replaced chilling water.

More information is available at this Facebook event page. You will not want to miss this.

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The Fugue is now available! 

Dear friends, my novel, The Fugue, is now available for worldwide purchase. I know that fans of Finding The Moon in Sugar will find The Fugue an engaging, challenging but also deeply rewarding read. If you’ve never read my work before, The Fugue is a great place to start. 

So…where can you get the book? 
If you’re in Chicago, I hope you’ll come to my book launch reading and gathering. It’s Dec 17th at 6:30 at City Lit Books. Click on the hyperlink for more details.

Of course, you can order it anywhere books are sold. I encourage readers to support their local indie bookstore. Also, know that The Book Table in Oak Park will be selling signed copies of The Fugue at a discounted price of under $15, AND they ship in the USA. 

The Book Table
1045 Lake Street
Oak Park, IL 60301
(001) 708.386.9800

Obviously, Amazon’s got it. If you do t live near an indie bookstore, or you’re outside the USA and don’t like reading books on Kindle or an iPad, these links will take you to the book.

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Germany (Ships to Lithuania!) 

Amazon France

Amazon Japan

Thanks so much for your interest and support. 

  


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Concert for Ukraine in Chicago 

Saturday, March 28th at 7:00, my wife, Maria Storm, will be playing a benefit concert for Ukrainian relief organizations. The first half of the concert, in Chicago’s gorgeous Second Presbyterian Church, will feature classical music by Maria and New York pianist Emiko Sato. The second half will feature intense and moving performances by Constance Volk, Matthew Santos and Foma (from Ukraine). 

If you’d like to donate to this important benefit but cannot attend the concert, please log in to Facebook.com/KyivCommittee 




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My brilliant wife plays violin here

…with her amazing colleagues. This is Oblivion by Astor Piazzolla, played live at York PAC, Anderson University. Petar Jankovich, guitar. Maria Storm (my wife), violin. Azusa Tashiro, violin. Amanda Grimm, viola. Kyra Saltman, cello.


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Brilliant violinist to play live

Readers, this is what the internet is for!

This Monday, December 9th, my lovely wife, Maria Storm, is going to perform with members of CUBE and Alicia Berneche live in WFMT Chicago studios. It begins at 20:00 Central Standard Time, or -6 GMT.  The concert will be broadcast over the internet.

Place this link into your reading lists.

From the WFMT website: “Chicago’s contemporary-music ensemble, with guest soprano Alicia Berneche, present some new holiday music by Patricia Morehead, Prokofiev’s Five Poems of Anna Akhmatova, and Eric Whitacre’s Five Hebrew Love Songs.”

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Raising kids to speak multiple languages

I have a new article up on The Good Men Project, Raising Trilingual Kids in America. It’s about my attempt with my wife to teach our children to speak (and read) Lithuanian and Russian alongside English.

One of the things I found attractive about my wife, beside her violin playing abilities and her energy as an artist, was her capacity to learn languages, and her fluency in five. I consider languages to be treasures, and if I met a djinni, I’d ask to become fluent in every language that has ever been spoken on earth, even dead languages like Prussian. I can’t explain this fascination. It’s similar to my obsession with planting a garden. I don’t take for granted the human capacity for communication, flawed as it is, and I have never heard a language that I found ugly or crass. I remember sleeping in an airport one time and listening to a group of very tired Moroccan men speaking Arabic together. It sounded like a train ride, long and romantic, through an orange and brown mountain range of ancient rocks.

My daughter has learned more Lithuanian before her fourth birthday than I knew before my fifth, and she certainly knows more English than I did as a toddler (I knew virtually none). Some of the ways she translates language have really educated me about the syntax of English and Lithuanian, and the meanings of certain words. I can’t explain them here without going through a long explication of now negatives work in Lithuanian, and how the concept of “sense” is communicated in my old, archaic language. But I’ll say this: you don’t really understand what language you speak until you try to learn a second one. If there’s any universal, absolute value to learning another language its that you realize the one you’ve grown up with isn’t normal, and that many of the assumptions you have about reality are completely artificial, often based on the syntax you have at your disposal. Alan Watts talks about this in his lectures Learning the Human Game.

So far, the lessons dad has gained in the process are so much bigger than the ones my kids have gathered. I’ll be presenting those lessons in my memoir about PTSD. This article is a warm-up of sorts to some of the topics I’ll be covering.

I hope you enjoy and share it.