Liquid Ink

The official website of Gint Aras, Finalist 2016 CWA Book Award


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Intimate nights with Duo KaMa

If you’re in Chicago this week, you won’t want to miss these small, intimate concerts with the electrifying Duo KaMa.  Violinist Maria Storm and pianist Kathy Tagg combine energy, technical mastery and a beguiling, enchanting aesthetic to captivate you. Click here for recordings of them performing Debussy, Dvorak and Nigun, and just imagine how they would sound in a salon.

This week you have the chance to hear them in house concerts as well as an intriguing date at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art. This is the last chance to hear Duo KaMa play in Chicago in 2017.

Here are the dates and locations:

House Concert,
Thursday, September 14th, 7:00 PM
1146 S Taylor, Oak Park, Illinois

Gallery Concert
Saturday, September 16, 7:00 PM
Ukrainian Institute of Modern Art
2320 W Chicago Avenue

House Concert
Sunday, September 17, 4:00 PM
5850 W Race Chicago, IL

I hope to see you there.

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Artists you should know: KaMa Duo in Chicago

Admit it. You’ve never heard the music of the KaMa duo. However, all of this can change for those readers interested in visiting the Fine Arts Building in Chicago on November 18th. If you have the pleasure of listening to these ladies play, you’ll be so deeply moved and provoked by their mastery to be left with an impression for the rest of your life. Hearing their music is like standing under the volume of the Niagara Falls, if sunlight and an angel’s embrace replaced chilling water.

More information is available at this Facebook event page. You will not want to miss this.

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Unburdened from sin or connected to God

Reviews of The Fugue have, until this point, compared the book to the likes of Fyodor Dostoevsky, Victor Hugo, Virginia Woolf, Boris Pasternak, Betty Smith, Nelson Algren, Richard Powers, Flannery O’Connor and others.

Commentators have noted the book’s fugue-like structure, its homage to classical music and opera, and its use of various techniques of visual art, among them simultaneity. The latest review, from Amy Strauss Friedman, writing for the Yellow Chair Review notes the novel’s similarity to pointillism.

Aras has given us a masterful web of narrative that feels much like pointillism in painting, in which an artist uses individual dots to create a larger, intricate image.

She goes on to write:

The Fugue is an epic work that will ensnare you from the first chapter and won’t let you go even after you’ve finished it. It is a composition that all should hear.

I guess the only way to see if all these people are just talking craziness is to read the book for yourself. As your library to order it, get it at your favorite bookstore or buy it here.

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Two new articles today

I’m excited that two new articles about The Fugue appeared today, one of them in time for Lent.

The first is from Newcity, the Chicago alternative press. Amy Danzer calls The Fugue a must read.

Aras’ novel examines the persistent haunting of traumatic pasts, the burden of bearing dark secrets, the lightness that comes with confession, the profound desire to feel understood, and the varying degrees to which people are responsible to one another.

The second is Leland Cheuk’s interview of me. You can read it in Entropy. I talk to Cheuk about Catholic guilt, the state of publishing, trauma and how to remain accessible while writing about topics like visual art and classical music.

I have no training in visual art and only a year of piano. I’m neither a composer nor a sculptor—for that matter, neither am I a priest or a physician, two important players in the narrative—but I really wish I could be everyone at once and learn everything they know. Writing a novel is, for me, a vicarious experience. Life forces us to pick a limited number of roles. But a novel is an antidote to life’s pigeonholing.

Please check out these publications and share the articles.

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The Fugue is now available! 

Dear friends, my novel, The Fugue, is now available for worldwide purchase. I know that fans of Finding The Moon in Sugar will find The Fugue an engaging, challenging but also deeply rewarding read. If you’ve never read my work before, The Fugue is a great place to start. 

So…where can you get the book? 
If you’re in Chicago, I hope you’ll come to my book launch reading and gathering. It’s Dec 17th at 6:30 at City Lit Books. Click on the hyperlink for more details.

Of course, you can order it anywhere books are sold. I encourage readers to support their local indie bookstore. Also, know that The Book Table in Oak Park will be selling signed copies of The Fugue at a discounted price of under $15, AND they ship in the USA. 

The Book Table
1045 Lake Street
Oak Park, IL 60301
(001) 708.386.9800

Obviously, Amazon’s got it. If you do t live near an indie bookstore, or you’re outside the USA and don’t like reading books on Kindle or an iPad, these links will take you to the book.

Amazon USA

Amazon UK

Amazon Germany (Ships to Lithuania!) 

Amazon France

Amazon Japan

Thanks so much for your interest and support. 

  


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Musical “palindrome”—Bach’s Crab Canon

They didn’t tell you about this one on MTV.

There was a time in my life, right between 2000-2003, when I would listen to Bach almost every day. Maybe some day I’ll write about why I stopped (or cut back), why the genius got to be too heavy. Recently, I clicked on the old Bach mp3s (in addition to the Mingus) and I was taken back to that point in his music where time and space and sound and distance all become one, layers forming on top of layers, things that are “the same” even though they become utterly different. It’s a mindfuck. Bach is cooler than your iPhone or your Xbox or your Fantasy Draft.

Then a friend randomly posted this one on Facebook. I just loved it. It’s not accurate to call this a palindrome, which should read identically no matter if you start at the beginning or end. (Like this: May a moody baby doom a yam?) But you get my point. The video makes it all the more insane.