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The official website of Gint Aras, Finalist 2016 CWA Book Award

Frederick Douglass on Christianity

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In an effort to celebrate Black History Month, I’ll be quoting from black American intellectuals every day until March. The first is from Frederick Douglass, of whom our book-hating president made a subject yesterday in a self-aggrandizing speech.

This is from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, 1845:

What I have said respecting and against religion, I mean strictly to apply to the slaveholding religion of this land, and with no possible reference to Christianity proper; for, between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference — so wide, that to receive the one as good, pure, and holy, is of necessity to reject the other as bad, corrupt, and wicked. To be the friend of the one, is of necessity to be the enemy of the other. I love the pure, peaceable, and impartial Christianity of Christ: I therefore hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of this land. Indeed, I can see no reason, but the most deceitful one, for calling the religion of this land Christianity. I look upon it as the climax of all misnomers, the boldest of all frauds, and the grossest of all libels.

800px-frederick_douglass_portrait

Photo of Frederick Douglass from Wikipedia.